Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

What Is Lindy Hop?

Take a look at this page.

What Do Manchester Lindy Offer?

Take a look at this page.

When Do Your Weekly Events Take Place?

Take a look at this page.

Do I need to bring a partner?

Nope. Come alone, come with partner-less friends, come with a partner, whichever – just come along! You are very welcome!

Are you really open every week? 

We close for two weeks over the Xmas period and occasionally we’ve had to cancel due to riots, snow, and venues that have shut for emergency repairs. Otherwise we are open, dancing and waiting for you! In the event of an unforeseen closure we will tweet/blog/Facebook and email to let you know. Join our mailing list here:

Do I need to book? This depends on the event, see below.

For our Tuesday night social dance with classes, bookings are not available. Just turn up, and pay £5 on the door. Try and arrive 15 minutes early (at 7.30pm) just to get settled in, so that the class can start promptly. If you arrive more than 15 minutes after the advertised class time, you’ll be asked to wait for the start of the next class/the social dance, so as not to disrupt the other students.

Yes, booking is required for our birthday and Xmas parties and for MCRLX

For our workshops, yes, booking is absolutely necessary. These sell out early. Booking info will be listed with workshop details.

Where are you events held?

Tuesday night Swing Socials take place at central Manchester venue, Manchester Hall (formerly known as Freemasons’ Hall), Bridge Street, Manchester, M3 3BT 

Other events are held in a variety of venues around Manchester. Details will be on individual event posts.

Can I bring my child/teen/17 year old friend along?

Unfortunately, no. Manchester Lindy only provide events and classes for dancers over the age of 18. We realise this is frustrating for younger dancers, so we suggest anyone interested in Jazz era dances start by learning Rhythm Tap – the dances share the same roots, and Tap dance classes are widely available for children, so you should be able to find something suitable.

What is the average age of a Manchester Lindy dancer? 

Mean, Median or Mode? 😀

Our dancers range from 18 – 75(ish), but most can tick the 20-35 box. Everyone over the age of 18 is welcome!

How many people are in each class?

Each level attracts around 40 dancers,  Jazz can be even bigger! January is our busiest period and we are quieter over the summer.

What do people wear?

All sorts! Jeans and T-shirts, office attire, full on fancy vintage petticoats. If you are comfortable and your outfit doesn’t pose a danger to you or to others, we are happy. Flat, closed toe, lightweight, tie on shoes are recommended for new starters (No DM boots, high heels or bare feet, please!) leave bracelets and watches with metal straps at home. Using an antiperspirant deodorant is pretty much compulsory. Read more here.

Do I need to be very fit?

Nope, you can take it at your own pace. Dancing is great exercise though, so you will see your fitness improve and it’s a lot more fun than jogging.

Am I likely to be injured?

Not if you behave in a sensible manner! Wearing appropriate footwear, trying not to bump into others (and apologising when you do!) and not performing lifts, jumps or air steps on the social floor keeps risks to a minimum. You are just as likely to be injured walking down the street or shopping in the January sales as you are when Lindy Hopping. However, by attending our events, you accept that you are doing so at your own risk and that you are responsible for your own well-being.

How long does it take to get really good at Lindy Hop?

Ages. Absolutely ages. Some of the committee have been dancing 10 plus years and still feel like they have loads to learn. Basically, we’ll let you know when we get there, if we get there. Ever.

Luckily, Swing dancing is an awful lot of fun, even if you aren’t very good at it!

Is it just like the Swing-a-Thon on Strictly Come Dancing?

Mmm… kinda. Not really. Social dance and performance dance are quite different, even if on the surface the dance is the same. Social dancing is like having a conversation, with music and movement instead of words. It’s a wonderful thing – come along and find out.

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